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Multiple Sclerosis

Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with statistics showing that at least two to three times more women than men develop the condition. MS involves an immune-mediated process in which an abnormal response of the body’s immune system is directed against the central nervous system (CNS). Within the CNS, the immune system causes inflammation that damages nerve fibres and myelin — a fatty substance that surrounds and insulates nerve fibres — as well as the specialised cells that make myelin. When myelin or nerve fibres are damaged, messages within the CNS are altered or stop completely. The damaged areas then develop scar tissue which gives the condition its name – multiple sclerosis.

 

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable condition that affects the brain and the spinal cord – and it is one of the most common causes of disability in younger adults. Scientists believe a combination of environmental and genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing the condition. There is also a growing school of thought that the illness could be linked to Lyme disease. Indeed, Lyme disease sufferers experience many of the most commonly reported MS symptoms such as fatigue, vision problems, muscle spasms, mobility difficulties, brain fog, depression, anxiety, speech and swallowing complications.

 


Multiple Sclerosis

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